VALUE (Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education)

Author: Associatian of American Colleges and Universities. Link to original: https://www.aacu.org/value-rubrics (English).
Tags: assessment, education, learning Submitted by evolkov 05.10.2016. Public material.
The VALUE rubrics were developed by teams of faculty experts representing colleges and universities across the United States through a process that examined many existing campus rubrics and related documents for each learning outcome and incorporated additional feedback from faculty. The rubrics articulate fundamental criteria for each learning outcome, with performance descriptors demonstrating progressively more sophisticated levels of attainment. The rubrics are intended for institutional-level use in evaluating and discussing student learning, not for grading. The core expectations articulated in all 15 of the VALUE rubrics can and should be translated into the language of individual campuses, disciplines, and even courses. The utility of the VALUE rubrics is to position learning at all undergraduate levels within a basic framework of expectations such that evidence of learning can by shared nationally through a common dialog and understanding of student success.

Translations of this material:

into Russian: ВОНВО (Валидная оценка научения в базовом высшем образовании). 0% translated in draft.
Submitted for translation by evolkov 05.10.2016

Text

Association of American Colleges and Universities

Civic Engagement VALUE Rubric

for more information, please contact [email protected]

The VALUE rubrics were developed by teams of faculty experts representing colleges and universities across the United States through a process that examined many existing campus rubrics and related documents for each learning outcome and incorporated additional feedback from faculty. The rubrics articulate fundamental criteria for each learning outcome, with performance descriptors demonstrating progressively more sophisticated levels of attainment. The rubrics are intended for institutional-level use in evaluating and discussing student learning, not for grading. The core expectations articulated in all 15 of the VALUE rubrics can and should be translated into the language of individual campuses, disciplines, and even courses. The utility of the VALUE rubrics is to position learning at all undergraduate levels within a basic framework of expectations such that evidence of learning can by shared nationally through a common dialog and understanding of student success.

Definition

Civic engagement is "working to make a difference in the civic life of our communities and developing the combination of knowledge, skills, values and motivation to make that difference. It means promoting the quality of life in a community; through both political and non-political processes." (Excerpted from Civic Responsibility and Higher Education, edited by Thomas Ehrlich, published by Oryx Press, 2000, Preface, page vi.) In addition, civic engagement encompasses actions wherein individuals participate in activities of personal and public concern that are both individually life enriching and socially beneficial to the community.

Framing Language

Preparing graduates for their public lives as citizens, members of communities, and professionals in society has historically been a responsibility of higher education. Yet the outcome of a civic-minded graduate is a complex concept. Civic learning outcomes are framed by personal identity and commitments, disciplinary frameworks and traditions, pre-professional norms and practice, and the mission and values of colleges and universities. This rubric is designed to make the civic learning outcomes more explicit. Civic engagement can take many forms, from individual volunteerism to organizational involvement to electoral participation. For students this could include community-based learning through service-learning classes, community-based research, or service within the community. Multiple types of work samples or collections of work may be utilized to assess this, such as:

The student creates and manages a service program that engages others (such as youth or members of a neighborhood) in learning about and taking action on an issue they care about. In the process, the student also teaches and models processes that engage others in deliberative democracy, in having a voice, participating in democratic processes, and taking specific actions to affect an issue.

The student researches, organizes, and carries out a deliberative democracy forum on a particular issue, one that includes multiple perspectives on that issue and how best to make positive change through various courses of public action. As a result, other students, faculty, and community members are engaged to take action on an issue.

The student works on and takes a leadership role in a complex campaign to bring about tangible changes in the public’s awareness or education on a particular issue, or even a change in public policy. Through this process, the student demonstrates multiple types of civic action and skills.

The student integrates their academic work with community engagement, producing a tangible product (piece of legislation or policy, a business, building or civic infrastructure, water quality or scientific assessment, needs survey, research paper, service program, or organization) that has engaged community constituents and responded to community needs and assets through the process.

In addition, the nature of this work lends itself to opening up the review process to include community constituents that may be a part of the work, such as teammates, colleagues, community/ agency members, and those served or collaborating in the process.

Glossary

The definitions that follow were developed to clarify terms and concepts used in this rubric only.

Civic identity: When one sees her or himself as an active participant in society with a strong commitment and responsibility to work with others towards public purposes.

Service-learning class: A course-based educational experience in which students participate in an organized service activity and reflect on the experience in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of personal values and civic responsibility.

Communication skills: Listening, deliberation, negotiation, consensus building, and productive use of conflict.

Civic life: The public life of the citizen concerned with the affairs of the community and nation as contrasted with private or personal life, which is devoted to the pursuit of private and personal interests.

Politics: A process by which a group of people, whose opinions or interests might be divergent, reach collective decisions that are generally regarded as binding on the group and enforced as common policy. Political life enables people to accomplish goals they could not realize as individuals. Politics necessarily arises whenever groups of people live together, since they must always reach collective decisions of one kind or another.

Government: " The formal institutions of a society with the authority to make and implement binding decisions about such matters as the distribution of resources, allocation of benefits and burdens, and the management of conflicts." (Retrieved from the Center for Civic Engagement Web site, May 5, 2009.)

Civic/ community contexts: Organizations, movements, campaigns, a place or locus where people and/ or living creatures inhabit, which may be defined by a locality (school, national park, non-profit organization, town, state, nation) or defined by shared identity (i.e., African-Americans, North Carolinians, Americans, the Republican or Democratic Party, refugees, etc.). In addition, contexts for civic engagement may be defined by a variety of approaches intended to benefit a person, group, or community, including community service or volunteer work, academic work.

Definition

Civic engagement is "working to make a difference in the civic life of our communities and developing the combination of knowledge, skills, values, and motivation to make that difference. It means promoting the quality of life in a community; through both political and non-political processes." (Excerpted from Civic Responsibility and Higher Education, edited by Thomas Ehrlich, published by Oryx Press, 2000, Preface, page vi.) In addition, civic engagement encompasses actions wherein individuals participate in activities of personal and public concern that are both individually life enriching and socially beneficial to the community.

Evaluators are encouraged to assign a zero to any work sample or collection of work that does not meet benchmark (cell one) level performance.

Capstone 4

Milestones 3 2

Benchmark 1

Diversity of Communities and Cultures

Demonstrates evidence of adjustment in own attitudes and beliefs because of working within and learning from diversity of communities and cultures. Promotes others' engagement with diversity.

Reflects on how own attitudes and beliefs are different from those of other cultures and communities. Exhibits curiosity about what can be learned from diversity of communities and cultures.

Has awareness that own attitudes and beliefs are different from those of other cultures and communities. Exhibits little curiosity about what can be learned from diversity of communities and cultures.

Expresses attitudes and beliefs as an individual, from a one-sided view. Is indifferent or resistant to what can be learned from diversity of communities and cultures.

Analysis of Knowledge

Connects and extends knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/ field/ discipline to civic engagement and to one's own participation in civic life, politics, and government.

Analyzes knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/ field/ discipline making relevant connections to civic engagement and to one's own participation in civic life, politics, and government.

Begins to connect knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/ field/ discipline to civic engagement and to tone's own participation in civic life, politics, and government.

Begins to identify knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/ field/ discipline that is relevant to civic engagement and to one's own participation in civic life, politics, and government.

Civic Identity and Commitment

Provides evidence of experience in civic- engagement activities and describes what she/he has learned about her or himself as it relates to a reinforced and clarified sense of civic identity and continued commitment to public action.

Provides evidence of experience in civic- engagement activities and describes what she/he has learned about her or himself as it relates to a growing sense of civic identity and commitment.

Evidence suggests involvement in civic- engagement activities is generated from expectations or course requirements rather than from a sense of civic identity

Provides little evidence of her/his experience in civic-engagement activities and does not connect experiences to civic identity.

Civic Communication

Tailors communication strategies to effectively express, listen, and adapt to others to establish relationships to further civic action

Effectively communicates in civic context, showing ability to do all of the following: express, listen, and adapt ideas and messages based on others' perspectives.

Communicates in civic context, showing ability to do more than one of the following: express, listen, and adapt ideas and messages based on others' perspectives.

Communicates in civic context, showing ability to do one of the following: express, listen, and adapt ideas and messages based on others' perspectives.

Civic Action and Reflection

Demonstrates independent experience and shows initiative in team leadership of complex or multiple civic engagement activities, accompanied by reflective insights or analysis about the aims and accomplishments of one’s actions.

Demonstrates independent experience and team leadership of civic action, with reflective insights or analysis about the aims and accomplishments of one’s actions.

Has clearly participated in civically focused actions and begins to reflect or describe how these actions may benefit individual(s) or communities.

Has experimented with some civic activities but shows little internalized understanding of their aims or effects and little commitment to future action.

Civic Contexts/Structures

Demonstrates ability and commitment to

collaboratively work across and within community contexts and structures to achieve a civic aim.

Demonstrates ability and commitment to work actively within community contexts and structures to achieve a civic aim.

Demonstrates experience identifying intentional ways to participate in civic contexts and structures.

Experiments with civic contexts and structures, tries out a few to see what fits.

The VALUE rubrics were developed by teams of faculty experts representing colleges and universities across the United States through a process that examined many existing campus rubrics and related documents for each learning outcome and incorporated additional feedback from faculty. The rubrics articulate fundamental criteria for each learning outcome, with performance descriptors demonstrating progressively more sophisticated levels of attainment. The rubrics are intended for institutional-level use in evaluating and discussing student learning, not for grading. The core expectations articulated in all 15 of the VALUE rubrics can and should be translated into the language of individual campuses, disciplines, and even courses. The utility of the VALUE rubrics is to position learning at all undergraduate levels within a basic framework of expectations such that evidence of learning can by shared nationally through a common dialog and understanding of student success.

Definition

Creative thinking is both the capacity to combine or synthesize existing ideas, images, or expertise in original ways and the experience of thinking, reacting, and working in an imaginative way characterized by a high degree of innovation, divergent thinking, and risk taking.

Framing Language

Creative thinking, as it is fostered within higher education, must be distinguished from less focused types of creativity such as, for example, the creativity exhibited by a small child’s drawing, which stems not from an understanding of connections, but from an ignorance of boundaries. Creative thinking in higher education can only be expressed productively within a particular domain. The student must have a strong foundation in the strategies and skills of the domain in order to make connections and synthesize. While demonstrating solid knowledge of the domain's parameters, the creative thinker, at the highest levels of performance, pushes beyond those boundaries in new, unique, or atypical recombinations, uncovering or critically perceiving new syntheses and using or recognizing creative risk-taking to achieve a solution.

The Creative Thinking VALUE Rubric is intended to help faculty assess creative thinking in a broad range of transdisciplinary or interdisciplinary work samples or collections of work. The rubric is made up of a set of attributes that are common to creative thinking across disciplines. Examples of work samples or collections of work that could be assessed for creative thinking may include research papers, lab reports, musical compositions, a mathematical equation that solves a problem, a prototype design, a reflective piece about the final product of an assignment, or other academic works. The work samples or collections of work may be completed by an individual student or a group of students.

Glossary

The definitions that follow were developed to clarify terms and concepts used in this rubric only.

Exemplar: A model or pattern to be copied or imitated (quoted from www.dictionary.reference.com/ browse/ exemplar).

Domain: Field of study or activity and a sphere of knowledge and influence.

Definition

Creative thinking is both the capacity to combine or synthesize existing ideas, images, or expertise in original ways and the experience of thinking, reacting, and working in an imaginative way characterized by a high degree of innovation, divergent thinking, and risk taking.

Evaluators are encouraged to assign a zero to any work sample or collection of work that does not meet benchmark (cell one) level performance.

Capstone 4

Milestones 3 2

Benchmark 1

Acquiring Competencies

This step refers to acquiring strategies and skills within a particular domain.

Reflect: Evaluates creative process and product using domain-appropriate criteria.

Create: Creates an entirely new object, solution or idea that is appropriate to the domain.

Adapt: Successfully adapts an appropriate exemplar to his/her own specifications.

Model: Successfully reproduces an appropriate exemplar.

Taking Risks

May include personal risk (fear of embarrassment or rejection) or risk of failure in successfully completing assignment, i.e. going beyond original parameters of assignment, introducing new materials and forms, tackling controversial topics, advocating unpopular ideas or solutions.

Actively seeks out and follows through on untested and potentially risky directions or approaches to the assignment in the final product.

Incorporates new directions or approaches to the assignment in the final product.

Considers new directions or approaches without going beyond the guidelines of the assignment.

Stays strictly within the guidelines of the assignment.

Solving Problems

Not only develops a logical, consistent plan to solve problem, but recognizes consequences of solution and can articulate reason for choosing solution.

Having selected from among alternatives, develops a logical, consistent plan to solve the problem.

Considers and rejects less acceptable approaches to solving problem.

Only a single approach is considered and is used to solve the problem.

Embracing Contradictions

Integrates alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas fully

Incorporates alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas in a exploratory way

Includes (recognizes the value of) alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas in a small way.

Acknowledges (mentions in passing) alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas.

Innovative Thinking

Novelty or uniqueness (of idea, claim, question, form, etc.)

Extends a novel or unique idea, question, format, or product to create new knowledge or knowledge that crosses boundaries.

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