Insane Clown Posse, Style and influences

Author: Wikipedia. Link to original: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insane_Clown_Posse#Style_and_influences (English).
Tags: антирасизм, музыка, политика, хип-хоп, хорроркор Submitted by Sein_Noman 02.04.2009. Public material.
Insane Clown Posse's performance style is often described as horrorcore hip hop, which "utilize[s] shocking (and blatantly over the top) narratives to give an over-exaggerated, almost cartoon-like version of urban deprivation in Detroit", according to author Sara Cohen

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into Russian: Insane Clown Posse, стиль и влияния. 2% translated in draft.
Submitted for translation by Sein_Noman 02.04.2009

Text

Insane Clown Posse's performance style is often described as horrorcore hip hop, which "utilize[s] shocking (and blatantly over the top) narratives to give an over-exaggerated, almost cartoon-like version of urban deprivation in Detroit", according to author Sara Cohen. The group's early work features a raw, minimalistic sound, which later evolved into a more rock-oriented style. The group's lyrics serve as morality tales, with songs focusing on subjects such as cannibalism, murder and necrophilia. Insane Clown Posse's debut album, Carnival of Carnage, features a politically-oriented focus, criticizing elitism and prejudice against those who live in the ghetto, while the album's liner notes criticize the Gulf War. The group's lyrics have opposed racism, bigotry, domestic violence, and child abuse.

Insane Clown Posse has covered songs by Geto Boys, Sly Fox, and Above the Law. Bruce and Utsler refer to the acid rap style of Esham as an influence on their own music, while Bruce has expressed admiration for Pearl Jam and Michael Jackson. Kimberly Chun of the San Francisco Chronicle described Insane Clown Posse's musical style as a mixture of "dub, goth, metal, shock rock and hip-hop, with a WWF announcer's delivery and shuffling stoner beats thrown in for good measure." Mike E. Clark's production for the group incorporates elements such as "carnival organ riffs, power chords and shotgun blasts [...] banjolike plucking and Van Halen-esque guitar squeals," while Bruce and Utsler sometimes alternate between rapping and screaming. In his review of The Tempest, Allmusic's David Jeffries writes that Bruce and Utsler "[rap] in a carnival barker fashion that fits with their circus motif, their Insane Clown disguises, and Mike E. Clark's big top-inspired production." Insane Clown Posse has influenced similar acts, such as Blaze Ya Dead Homie and Boondox.

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