Enclosed A

Author: en.wikipedia.org. Link to original: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enclosed_A (English).
Tags: anarchism, anarchy, libertarianism, market anarchism, symbolism, typography, wikipedia, анархизм, анархия, википедия, либертарианство, рыночный анархизм, символика, типографика Submitted by anarchofront 31.10.2011. Public material.
Enclosed A or circled Latin A (Ⓐ, ⓐ) is a typographical symbol. It is an "A" within a circle, and it occurs alongside many other enclosed alphanumerics.

Translations of this material:

into Russian: А в круге. Translation complete.
Submitted for translation by anarchofront 31.10.2011 Published 5 years, 6 months ago.

Text

Not to be confused with At sign (@).

Enclosed A or circled Latin A (Ⓐ, ⓐ) is a typographical symbol. It is an "A" within a circle, and it occurs alongside many other enclosed alphanumerics.

Uses

An A within a circle was adopted as a symbol by the United States Third Army (now the United States Army Central) in the early 20th century.

Anarchism

Nowadays, the symbol might be most recognised as an icon used by many people who identify or sympathize with anarchism. Despite the militaristic use noted above, by the dawn of the 21st century the enclosed A had largely supplanted the traditional Black Flag as the most-used symbol of that body of thought. Peter Marshall an author, philosopher and BBC television producer wrote that it represented the idea (as advanced by Peter Kropotkin and other anarchist theorists) that "Anarchy is Order"; early incarnations of the anarchist icon were expressed with an unenclosed A (Anarchy) superimposed over the O (Order) before evolving into the more formal form used modernly.[1]

Encodings

* The capitalized symbol (Ⓐ) can be generated with the unicode encoding "U+24B6" and the UTF-8 (hex.) encoding, "e2 92 b6".

* The lower case symbol (ⓐ) can be generated with the unicode encoding "U+24D0" and the UTF-8 (hex.) encoding "e2 93 90".

See also

* Anarchist symbolism — Circle-A

* Anarchist symbolism — Black Flag

* United States Army Central

References

1. Marshall, Peter. Demanding the Impossible. Fontana, London. 1993. p. 558

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